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20130108
20130108
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to honor the reverend martin luther king jr. on january the 19th, gun rights activists have announced that they will mark gun appreciation day two days before the president's inauguration. urging gun owners to turn out en masse at gun vendors with signs reading, hands off my guns. their latest contribution to curbing gun violence in america. let's get right to our panel. here in new york is msnbc contributor joy reid, who is also the managing editor of thegrio.com and in washington larry ward of gun appreciation day. mr. ward, can i begin with you? >> of course. >> you've said that the president wants to gut the second amendment. what specifically has this president done during his first four years in office to undermine your gun rights? what has he done? >> well, absolutely nothing. >> thank you. >> and the truth is he had to run for re-election, but what he said was -- and i believe joe biden guaranteed that they would pass sweeping gun control legislation by the end of the month. >> but, in fact, as you know, he promised when campaigning in 2008 to reinstate the 1994 ban on assault
uncle, worked at martin luther king hospital. he convinced his uncle to break into my personnel file. he got my personnel file and my address, there is no transportation in los angeles -- there is nothing. he took three buses and hitchhiked, making it to my old frame house in venice. i said, why are you here? he said i was in a car and we did drive by and i don't know what to do. you said you would always be there for me. there's the answer and the question. how are we always going to be there for bobby. how are we going to help young people at risk, people who are active, to build new identities? we begin with tattoo removal, legal expunged and and we work on attachment. every individual who wants to avoid being in a gang, who wants to leave the game, they need a role model and mentor, they need someone to be there. there is no single type of person. we need it the merging of former gang members, prosecutors and social workers and public defenders. you have all had that kid. he needs role models, job training, and real jobs. i was happy to hear that in the video, nothing stops the bulle
of first. in commemoration of martin luther king's birthday this month, i second supervisor campos words, they were beautiful. we have never had a woman of color as board president. and i think it is time for san francisco, in this diversity and pioneer spirit to address this and make this happen. congratulations to all of the new supervisors. welcome. i look forward to working with all of you. god bless. >> thank you. next speaker. >> mr. president, ladies and gentlemen. this is a new year. and the board of supervisors should set off on a new footing to do something tangible for those who cannot help themselves. for the past year, let bygones be bygones. but now, you have come into a new year, 2013. i urge you, i beseech you, to do something for the unfortunate, especially seniors. [indiscernible] -- a great number of us cannot do anything to help themselves. [indiscernible] please help them. all other [indiscernible] mr. president. i sincerely hope, pledge, beseech that that individual will [indiscernible] and do the right thing. thank you. >> president: thank you very much. let
only need a heartful of grace, a soul generated by love" . martin martin luther king junior. as all of we watched our family work in the community and we were to work with other people. it was a little crazy growing up in a political family. we had seven different phone lines and my mom wouldn't get the one with the seven buttons and we had seven phones and all of us on the phone all the time. no hold button. our house was always full of people. i see many of you here that became family. you were there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved thi
and martin luther king, those are families that own and will always be there forever and ever. you tell those folks, hey, we're going to make sure the commercial people, not the vbd, not the merchants, we're going to make sure they live up to their responsibility. they are supposed to make sure the doors are open for people to come in and do a lot of events and things. picture this if you would, instead of busses coming in at 5:00, what if you create the traffic there. they are right now in a serious crisis but it's just a block away. everybody is looking for foot traffic. everybody is looking for an opportunity to do things, bring people from somewhere, all you have to do is walk up the street and say for the next 30 days we're going to make sure there's a terrible outrageous discount so you folks can participate because they don't participate. the foot traffic is right there so you change the name, that's like going to fillmore and golden gate street and telling everybody on that block, we're going to name this happy corner. it don't make sense to change names. what makes sense
rights. he often quotes dr. martin luther king's iconic phrase. the arc of the universe is long but it bends toward justice. news today about medgar evers proves that point. evers emerged as a premiere fighter against segregation at the university of mississippi in the '50s and '60s. he was the naacp's first field secretary for the state of mississippi. a tireless fighter for equality and a father to a daughter and a son. in 1963, a water shed year for civil rights and the civil rights movement, president kennedy delivered his famous civil rights speech from the oval office. but just hours later on june 12th, 1963, medgar evers was assassinated in the driveway of his own home in jackson, mississippi, by a white supremacist. today we learned that legacy continues to live on and in a powerful way. evers' widow a civil rights force in her own right, will deliver the invocation at the swearing in ceremony for president obama. the president said
and freedom, jobs was number one. before martin luther king gave the i have a dream speech he gave it to the afl-cio in 1961 and he said we've really don't need to have the two movements. if you all would agree to desegregation movements we could have one movement. we don't need to have a separate movement and the afl-cio rejected it and rejected that offer. andy young tells a story in the introduction to the book called the closing door by gary and he says you know, after king was assassinated, the johnson administration came with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affir
president biden at the u.s. capitol. it will happen on monday, january 21st. now, that is also martin luther king day. interesting, though. the constitution says the president has to be sworn in specifically on the 20th day of january, not the 21st. but the 20th of january falls on a sunday this year. so they have decided to do this as kind of a two-step. on sunday, the 20th, chief justice john roberts will swear in president obama for his second term. but they'll do it at an official, small ceremony at the white house at noon on sunday. the following day, on monday, that will be the whole pomp and circumstance giant event. but that second swearing in ceremony, the big one on the dais with everybody there, that is going to be ceremonial, because the real one will have happened the day before. it's kind of weird, right? that this is the second time president obama and chief justice john roberts are going to have kind of a hinky time with the swearing in. remember what happened the first time with those two? chief justice said part of the oath wrong the first time. so just to be safe, they had
and freedom, jobs was number one. before martin luther king gave the i have a dream speech in washington, he gave to the a.f.l.c.i.o. in 1961. we don't need two movements. if you would agree to desegregate unions, we would have one movement. they rejected him and rejected that offer. andy young tells a story in the introduction to a book called "the closing door" and he says, you know, after king was assassinated, the johnson administration came with affirmative action and at the time, you may have read if not remembered, the civil rights movement, martin luther king had turned to full employment and poor people's campaigns as a principal demand. and the johnson administration, rather than coming up with full employment came up with affirmative action. you won't see eyes on the prize, black people marching on the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, native americans, that was the division. when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper middle class within the black community, a very small
for jobs and freedom, jobs was number one. before martin luther king gave the i have a dream speech in washington, he gave to the a.f.l.c.i.o. in 1961. we don't need two movements. if you would agree t desegregate unions, we would have one movement. they rejected him and rejected that offer. andy young tells a story in the introduction to a book called "the closing door" and he says, you know, after king was assassinated, the johnson administration came with affirmative action and at the time, you may have read if not remembered, the civil rights movement, martin luther king had turned to full employment and poor people's campaigns as a principal demand. and the johnson administration, rather than coming up with full employment came up with affirmative action. you won't see eyes on the prize, black people marching on the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, native americans, that was the division. when affirmative actn happened, we knew it would only help the upper middle class within the black community
. that is a quote from martin luther king, jr. out of keep on my wall, and i absolutely think that is the case. i'm very fortunate that he been able to devote my career to working on issues that i think about it. i think it matters that there is tremendous human devastation and brought out of unnecessary incarceration in this country. i think it is terrible that we treat children with such punitive measures that we have kind of created, we've adopted a whole system out of treating children like adults. that is, i don't think produces the kind of public safety outcomes that one would've hoped for your we have an ineffective system. the bottom line is that the system works, that would be one thing but with a wrist visit the rate we have we know this is not a system that works and there are better ways of going about addressing some of the serious problems. sometimes public health problems and other problems that we have. so i would just like to close by saying that to me this is really, there's a tremendous opportunity. in 2011 own over 23 states implemented some form of evidence-based policy to sa
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)